Friday, June 5, 2015

Jack White's Third Man Records Opening Detroit Location

Jack White's Third Man Records Opening Detroit Location:

Jack White's Third Man Records will open a new retail and office space in the rocker's hometown of Detroit after partnering with Shinola, a local watch and high-end goods manufacturer, to purchase a building in the city's Cass Corridor neighborhood.

The new store is scheduled to open by November 27th, Black Friday, and a press release teased several surprises to mark the occasion. The building at 441 W. Canfield Street already houses Shinola's flagship store, and was bought with the help of the company's founder, Tom Kartsotis.

While White founded Third Man in Detroit in 2001, the label has operated out of its Nashville headquarters since 2009. Still, White has hoped to bring Third Man back to his hometown, and the Cass Corridor is a fitting locale: White attended high school in the area, and the White Stripes performed their first show there as well.

In a statement, White called the Corridor "the most inspiring area of Detroit for me as an artist and as a Detroiter. From the great visual artists like Gordon Newton to the music of the Gories, and the birth of the Detroit garage rock scene, the Corridor has nurtured Detroit's soul and inventiveness for decades."

The purchase of the space, and partnership with Third Man, will also be a further boon to Shinola, which has played a crucial role in revitalizing Detroit and bringing manufacturing jobs back to the city. Though it began as a watch company, Shinola has expanded its purview to include bicycles, pet supplies, leather goods, apparel, speakers, turntables and headphones.

As for White, opening a new Third Man location will be a fitting endeavor for the musician, who recently wrapped up an extensive world tour behind his 2014 LP Lazaretto and subsequently announced an extended break from the road. With his newfound downtime, the rocker has been co-executive producing American Epic, a documentary about primitive recording devices from the 1920s and defending Tidal. The rocker and co-owner of the recently relaunched streaming service answered questions about the service in Third Man's FAQ section and in verse, with a poem he posted to the Third Man Books website.

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